Academics / Faculty Tina
Fallani

"I am very interested in the discussions that we have in class because the films we discuss touch upon various issues, both historical and social, that are of great interest." –Tina Fallani

Film and sound editor for renowned films such as The Secret Garden, directed by Agnieszka Holland, Dracula and The Godfather Triology, directed by Francis Ford Coppola, and Willow, directed by George Lucas, Tina Fallani is specialized in film editing and script writing and is an expert in Italian cinema.

Tina Fallani teaches History of Italian Cinema at SACI. She has been a jury member at the San Francisco International Film Festival and a coordinator of the Florence Film Festival. She also teaches in the Florence programs of New York University, Syracuse University, and Georgetown University.

She has worked on many feature films including: first assistant film editor, The Secret Garden, directed by Agnieszka Holland; assistant film editor, Dracula, directed by Francis Ford Coppola; first assistant film editor, The Godfather Triology, directed by Francis Ford Coppola; film and sound editor, The Neon Empire, directed by Larry Penn; sound editor, Mountains of the Moon, directed by Bob Rafelson; assistant sound editor; Dead Poets Society, directed by Peter Weir; film and sound editor for post-production, Best Shot, Fantasty Film Ltd.; translation consultant on Willow, directed by George Lucas; film and sound editor, Of Men and Angels, directed by William Farley; worked on The Unbearable Lightness of Being, directed by Phil Kaufam.

Tina Fallani has a Diploma in Film Editing, Video and Film and the Scuola del cinema, Regione Lombardia Rai, Italian Radio and Television Network; Specialized Course in Script Writing with Tonino Guerra at Evviva Il Cinema, Repubblica di San Marino; studied Law at the University of Florence.

 

Teaching Philosophy

I have been teaching at SACI since 1992. I enjoy teaching very much because it keeps my mind in shape and I learn new things all the time. 

Italian cinema is very beautiful and it reflects the culture and the customs of the country. At SACI I teach a year-long course that covers Italian films from the early 1940s to the present. We study Neorealism through Fellini, Antonioni, Rossellini, Visconti, Bertolucci, Salvatores, Troisi and other Italian directors of the ‘cinema d’autore,’ and continue all the way to Benigni. The films, in VHS or DVD format, are all dubbed in English or sub-titled. Each semester we watch about thirteen films and discuss them in class. Students read interesting articles, reviews and books to learn more about the directors and films that we study.

I am very interested in the discussions that we have in class because the films we discuss touch upon various issues, both historical and social, that are of great interest. I also like to compare different ways of seeing the same problems from an ‘American’ point of view and a ‘European’ point of view. We usually have very animated conversations and I must say that we have fun while learning.

"I am very interested in the discussions that we have in class because the films we discuss touch upon various issues, both historical and social, that are of great interest." –Tina Fallani

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