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"Time + Skin," SACI Installation and Performance Art Students Exhibit Works in Palazzo Jules Maidoff

Photos by Victor Restrepo

SACI Installation and Performance Art students exhibit selected works and projects in “Time + Skin” at Palazzo Jules Maidoff in Florence. 

Students in SACI’s Installation and Performance Art course, led by instructor Pietro Gaglianò, exhibited selected works and projects from the semester in “Time + Skin,” their final exhibition held on April 15th at SACI’s Palazzo Jules Maidoff in Florence. "Time + Skin" examined how time interacts with the physical self, conceptual self, and society. Works by eleven students were presented to an audience throughout the palazzo.

Participating artists included Alexandra Marsh, Christopher Norcross, Robin DeSantis, Diana Pereyra, Amie Sillah, Chelsea Whelham, Mary Crenshaw, Piper Scheifele, Emi Driscoll, Hayley Pike, and Nhi Le Phuong.

Throughout the semester, the Installation and Performance Art course involved group discussions and individual meditations on the concept of time: time can by exchanged, sold, or put under surveillance by those who buy it in the form of working hours. So what does it mean to have free time, or to be free to own and manage our time? Students investigate personal, collective, historical, social, aesthetical, and ethical issues connected to this concept.

Learn more about courses offered at SACI.

Participating Artists

Alexandra Marsh, The Burden of Body, installation
I want people to feel uneasy, uncomfortable, disturbed. I want to push people to understand the body in a different way. I want people to understand that bodies can be a burden, and sometimes it is our bodies that cause us the most pain.

Christopher Norcross, A.R.M., installation
The work addresses the struggle against the flesh. It evokes the pain of historicity and ‘progress,’ and situates the ‘I’ that speaks outside its corporeal form, the subject of a mechanical process situated in an artificial time.

Robin DeSantis, Hands on Fate, performance 
Domestic chores like cooking and sewing require time and patience, both precious commodities in today’s busy world. We tend to outsource common tasks for the sake of convenience, but we shouldn’t forget to slow down every so often and use our hands. Or we risk losing touch with the sense of touch itself.

Diana Pereyra, Scars, performance
The outcome of this performance depends on how honest and reflective the conversation flows in regards to the reflection on time or the fact that we as humans inhabit our bodies kept in skin throughout our lives.

Amie Sillah, I’m On This New Diet, performance
The performance tackles the phenomenon of trendy, unreliable, harmful diets that surround us and, over time, have a dramatic toll on our bodies.

Chelsea Whelham, Wolves and Sheep, performance
This performance is a personal reaction to certain benevolent-sexist statements I have been receiving for most of my post-adolescent life. From my experience, long hair has been a central part of women’s beauty and a huge part of my own self-worth.

Mary Crenshaw, Control and Collapse, performance
My body has always been a vessel of control for me. The desire of power over my body ended up stripping me of all power and my attempt to find identity through control of my body ended up stripping me of any sense of self.

Piper Scheifele, Spaghetti Target, performance
I am comfortable in my own skin no matter what transformations my body goes through. The act of “targeting” is the action society would typically perform and the acting of “popping” these balloons is my voice standing up against these societal norms.

Emi Driscoll, Lapse, performance
I want to express the inevitability of fallibility, in terms of the human body. We tend to think that we are the strongest creatures on this Earth, capable of anything. Yet, we are not impervious to shortcomings, we are created to meet an end which is constantly approaching us.

Hayley Pike, Echo, performance
This performance makes explicit the idea of re-using the social cues we get from other people to construct a new meaning. My aim to examine how the displacement of time or the reproduction in another body changes the meaning of the words spoken.

Nhi Le Phuong, Reverse Time, performance 
The performance can be seen as a “goodbye," a celebration, an appreciation of the time the artist had in the incredible art community in Italy and of the valuable lessons she learned so far from her mentors as well as her colleagues.


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