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SACI MFA Talks: Apprehensions of the Material World

Join us for SACI MFA Talks: Apprehensions of The Material World, presented by SACI MFA candidates in Studio Art and Communication Design

Wednesday April 14th, 2021
5:00pm - 5:30pm (Italian time) – Communication Design
6:00pm - 7:30pm (Italian time) – Studio Art

On Wednesday, April 14th, SACI graduate students in the Studio Art and Communication Design programs, in tandem with their final group exhibition Apprehensions of the Material World, will present their work to the public in the SACI MFA Talks. Join us on Zoom for this two-part, free event to meet the graduates and hear in-depth discussions about their work as they embark upon their final exhibition and upcoming graduation from SACI’s MFA programs.

The talks will be moderated by MFA in Communication Design Director Camilla Torna and MFA in Studio Art Program Director Kirsten Stromberg. Participating artists and designers include MFA in Communication Design candidate Bridget Hannah and MFA in Studio Art candidates Joe CiminoEric FreyArais MeteyardMelissa Morris, and David Neal
 


MFA Talk: Communication Design

Wednesday April 14th, 2021
5:00pm - 5:30pm (Italian time)

What makes a space a place? MFA in Communication Design candidate Bridget Hannah will discuss her thesis project, in which she questions the human approach to urban space by individuals ranging from short-term visitors to residents, and transforms our personal mental mapping into a collection of “Blob Maps” that enrich a collective vision of places and provide meaningful insights into places that would not emerge otherwise.

"Space is a common symbol of freedom in the Western world. Space lies open; it suggests the future and invites action […]. Enclosed and humanized space is place. Compared to space, place is a calm center of established values. Human beings require both space and place." 
- Yi-Fu Tuan, geographer

 

MFA Talk: Studio Art

Wednesday April 14th, 2021
6:00pm - 7:30pm (Italian time)

MFA in Studio Art Candidates Joe Cimino, Eric Frey, Arais Meteyard, Melissa Morris, and David Neal will discuss their recent bodies of work and research at the end of their 2-year MFA. 

Joe Cimino’s work in time based mediums, predominantly video and sound, invites us to extend our sense-relations of the suburban every-day to focus on what lies on the edges and peripheries, revealing unseen/untold histories that touch on the socio-economic, cultural and perceptual implications that this shift entails.  

Eric Frey’s work utilizes the bureaucratic aesthetic and the practices of governmental institutions in order to create a new institution to preserve and protect memories. He has created The International Mnemonic Object Registration Administration as an umbrella organization within which the Administration’s Ministry of Mnemosyne collects memories that have been imprinted on mnemonic objects by humans and non-humans through his ongoing participatory art project.

Arais Meteyard’s work in animation, bookmaking, painting and drawing, plays with non-directional narratives and polysemic forms. It intentionally upends rational and logical narratives as a contemporary critique and reveals the gaps in our thinking in order to see the poetry within.

Melissa Morris’s work links posthumanism and the tradition of oil painting, reflecting on the modernist grid and the implications when it shifts and collapses.  In un/doing the static states of the horizontal and the vertical, she questions these forms as interminable maps to our world socially, politically and internally and proposes re-patternings to the world around us.

David Neal’s work in video, photography, performance and installation, focuses on institutional critique and the decolonization of dominant institutions. His recent work highlights the inequalities and vulnerabilities within educational systems, sewing together the relations between body and language, power and control, oppression and humiliation in educational spaces while offering the possibility to ‘leave the class.'

 

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