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SACI GLOBAL STUDIOS: Meet our Students

Cover Image: Bridget Hannah, MFA in Communication Design

SACI Global Studios

SACI MFA and Post-Bac students present SACI Global Studios, a virtual exploration of their research in place of the traditional SACI Open Studios event.

SACI MFA in Studio Art, MFA in Photography, MFA in Communication Design, and Post-Bac in Studio Art students continue their artistic research in Florence while respecting Italian government regulations. Because visitors cannot currently enter their studios to see their works in person, our students have decided to demonstrate their works and research from this semester through a virtual Open Studios on the SACI website. The traditional SACI Graduate Open Studios are therefore “going global” to become SACI Global Studios. The event will take place online from April 10th through April 17th.

Exchange and collaboration are important foundations in the development of artwork, especially for emerging artists still experimenting within their artistic poetics and research, and are therefore vital for the art student in the journey to becoming a professional artist. In the spirit of this growth, exchange, and collaboration, we invite you to view the progress of our students through these virtual methods.

 

Throughout SACI Global Studios, students will be presenting interactive, discussion-based elements and artwork viewings from April 10th to April 17th in our Facebook Event. Contribute to the conversation, give valuable feedback to the artists, and follow along as they explore themes from their research and studies. RSVP to the event to receive post notifications. 

 

If you would like to inquire further about specific works, please write to the SACI Gallery.  


Post-Bac in Studio Art

Program Director: Justin Randolph Thompson

"The group of artists in these open studios offer an altered perspective and shifted focus rooted in a process of collective dialogue and shared space. The works range from painting to sculpture and encompass a broad array of approaches to art making, all of which have social foundations and implications. Drawing upon one year of profound reflection and shared studio space, this group of artists, all of whom shifted residence from the United States to Italy, offer a refreshing yet weighted look at the Florentine context subverted as a site for cultural production and a place for the questioning of the legitimacies of framing histories and canons. This open studios is an attempt to mend the neglected value of art to enact change that is simultaneously personal and collective."

- Justin Randolph Thompson

  • Ginnia Araujo

     

    Ginnia is a ceramic and sculpture artist who experiments with patterns, texture, and language to invite the user to reflect on the meaning of words and images.

     

     

    Artwork

  • Linu Del Deo

     

    I use my practice as a multimedia artist to study the discourse revolving around so-called “degenerate” artists and their creative rights, responding to the authoritarian policing of dark fantasy and the ironic romanticism of abuse which individuals coming out of traumatic situations use to connect and cope.

    See below to read comments about Linu's work by Anna Lisa Baroni Frittelli.

     

     

    Artwork

     

    Comments by Anna Lisa Baroni Frittelli

    As soon as I saw them, I immediately appreciated these two small works by Linu Del Leo. I was attracted by the almost science fiction mystery that seemed to be behind it. Plants: but what kind of plants? Fruits: good to eat or not? Creatures: benevolent or evil?

    Messengers of a fantasy or technodistopic apocalypse?

    The ambiguous nature of those fruits raised more questions than the answers it provided, and thus paved the way for various interpretations. Those smiling (or sneering) fruits, those protective peduncles and sepals (or snatchers), the branches planted on the ground (or torn with force), described a familiar "landscape", from a kitchen garden, yet they revealed a secret background, something that would have had to stay hidden.

    Then I went to read the words of the artist, and her representations of tomatoes appeared to me more clearly.

    "The symbolic use of the tomato plant has been instrumental to my work. Once considered toxic by the elite, because the acid in the fruit caused the lead in their silver plates to bleed through and poison them, while common folk eating tomatoes in wooden dishes were unharmed, tomato plants serves as a reminder that "toxic" art may be nourishing to those coming from difficult backgrounds. "

    So the symbolic strength of those drawings went beyond my first fictional-narrative impressions, to involve a militant dimension as an "unexpected subject,” to borrow and translate an expression of Carla Lonzi.

    These deviant fruits, which drip poison into silver plates, are a source of awareness for a prejudiced community. They prefigure themselves as a lunge to comforting and hyper-normalized representations, bringing to the fore and reversing the concepts of stigmatization, reprehensible and immoral.

    But I want to end by saying that beyond any reflection I may have made, inevitably dictated by my training and experience, I like these drawings also because they are fresh, and powerful.

    Anna Lisa Baroni Frittelli has worked at Frittelli Arte Contemporanea since 1990. She mainly deals with archives, including that of Visual Poetry and collateral events to main exhibitions.

  • Nara Seymour

     

    Nara Seymour works with subtleties and near invisibility to explore decay in its natural state and elements that juxtapose it. Seymour’s work seeks ways to protect the fragile wounds that have not healed.

     

     

     

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  • Laura Silverman

     

    With the use of expressive colors and mark-making, the work of Laura Silverman aims to create a response to feelings of grief and a reflection on her own body's relation to time and space.

     

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  • Mckinley Streett

     

    Mckinley uses absurdism as a means of depicting the apocalyptic nature of our current political climate.

     

     

     

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  • Lyla Zimmerman

     

    Through experimentation of medium, material, and content, Lyla intends to create a visual representation of female sexual empowerment. Through self-sexual expression, her work allows sex to be a topic of discussion rather than an act of obscenity. Using her own sexual experiences as inspiration, her work aims to humanize sex positivity and inform the viewer on the politics of pleasure, while creating a sexually informative environment through the eyes of a sex-conscious artist. By minimizing the concept of vulgarity and normalizing pleasure, she hopes to expand upon her own sexual boundaries and share sex-related content that both provokes and stimulates the viewer.

    See below to read comments by artist and SACI DIS instructor Francesco Lauretta.

     

    Artwork

     

    Comments by Francesco Lauretta

    Strange, but not too strange. Generally, female artists are those who offer important works on sexuality. Among the works I’ve seen from young artists currently frequenting the spaces of SACI, I was captured by a particular painting by Lyla Zimmerman. I believe it is a small picture - I don’t know the measurements - a detail, as indeed Lyla’s other works published on the blog appear to be. In the picture, one hand, the right, holds the right breast, while the other hand is relaxed. The left arm is extended ... The painting is like a trap, an indicator that captures the gaze of the observer right there, in this mutilated body nailed on canvas; we do not know who the woman is, we know nothing about her, and here it does not matter who she is, how she is made; the gesture exists here, by the claw-hand, which captures us. The hand looks like a stump. She grabs, but it is also possible - and most probably it is so - that she caress her own breast, a gesture that alludes to the pleasure of a certain autoeroticism, but here that gesture is jarring. The hand painted in this way, so gnarled, heavily presses on the breast which bends unnaturally slightly upwards, as if the body we see before us was stretched out, that can also be deduced from the ‘comma’ that marks the fold of the basin. This tiny clue naturally tells us that even though the hand is heavy, the breasts are almost squeezed, we are facing an extraordinarily intimate moment of pleasure or "wanting" for pleasure. Yet there is something, at least that I see, something deep-seated that puts me in the strange condition of not fully understanding if what I see is seductive or repulsive, if there is pleasure or pain. This depends on how Lyla painted the picture. Had she painted fluidly, harmoniously, the hand, the body, and the tension we are invested in from in front of the canvas would probably drop, and the pleasure would be - how to say - explained, seen, perceived. The pink, gray, and blue complexion has nothing seductive to it; it is frigid. The hand-claw does not caress the gaze, and the breast, it scratches. She is nervous. This painting is subtle because it shows us a gesture of pleasure but also its opposite, and we, the spectators, are forced to look, petrified, like voyeurs, through the peephole of the canvas and on that trunk of a totally mutilated body. It makes me think of Marcel Duchamp's latest work, oddly enough, of Dati, where we see a woman lying in a strange landscape with her genitals in the foreground. We do not know what seduces us, but such spying, seeing through the peephole, and violating intimacy is already an erotic gesture in which even the observer is a participant, and a victim.


    Francesco Lauretta, born in Ispica 1964, lives and works in Florence. After training at the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice with Emilio Vedova and a thesis on James Lee Byars, Francesco Lauretta moved to Turin. There he began to exhibit monumental works, white sculptures bordering on minimalism but evocative of a certain baroque spirit and narrative, olfactor. He also experimented with installation, performance, and video, and from 2003 began to work on a redefinition of painting as language and on the concept of the painter as an existential condition, exploring techniques, processes, formal outcomes, deviations, limits, and possible failures. Since 2010, he has been working on "I racconti funesti,” a series of allegories in which he exercises writing as a tool for understanding his research. Recently he started a project on freedom and invention by understanding painting as the foundation of worlds, immense and possible.

    Since October 2017, with Luigi Presicce, he has run the Scuola di Santa Rosa, a free drawing school in Florence. His most recent solo exhibitions, among many in galleries and institutional spaces, are "Pasavento" Fenysua, Florence; "In hora mortis,” Tenuta dello Scompiglio, Vorno; "The Battle," Rossini Foundation, Briosco MB (2018); "Twice," Giovanni Bonelli gallery, Milan; "Inesistenze," at the Z2o Zanin gallery, Rome (2015); "A new painting exhibition," in several historical locations in Scicli (2014); and "Balance Exercises,” at the GAM Galleria of Modern Art, Palermo (2013). Among his many group exhibitions in Italy and abroad are "Walking on the Planet,” Casa Masaccio, San Giovanni Valdarno (2015); "PPS- Landscape and People of Sicily,” Palazzo Riso in Palermo and Frigoriferi Milanesi in Milan (2011); and "Visions in New York City,” Macy Art Gallery, New York (2010). He has also participated in special projects created by collectives of artists and curators, including, among others, “Racconto di Venti,” Milan (2015); “The Wall (archives),” Milan (2015); “Nuvole,” Scicli (2014); “Madeinfilandia,” Pieve a Presciano, Arezzo (2013); and “The feast of the living (reflecting on death),” Porto San Cesario, Lecce (2013).

MFA in Studio Art - 2nd-Year

Program Director: Kirsten Stromberg

"In the true spirit of Open Studios, the SACI MFA in Studio Art graduate students addressed the re-visioning of this biannual event, not as a symbol of something lost, but as a unique opportunity to reach out to communities around the world and to share their work in the larger sphere. This event has become not just an onsite Open Studios, but a website Global Studios for them to share their ‘studio spaces’ and work with you across time zones and borders. We welcome you to see what they have been up to."

- Kirsten Stromberg

  • Averi Biswas

     

    My art always concerns the inner self. Spontaneity and imagination brings the reality of the inside, which is more real than the reality of the outside. These are my interpretations of Tantric art.

     

     

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  • Tatjana Lightbourn

     

    Tatjana Lightbourn is an A. American artist who uses multimedia and performance installations to explore various dimensions of perception. Her work forms narratives, interprets humanity, and fosters the viscerally evocative experience. She places an emphasis on the transformation of tangible realities that eradicate and evade didactic frameworks. Through Tatjana’s work, emotions associated with race, identity, mental health, and gender are rendered into tangible/intangible illusions.

    See below to read comments about Tatjana's work by curator Filippo Bigagli.

     

     

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    Comments by Filippo Bigagli

    The Afro traces in Tatjana Lightbourn's artistic research are evident in her works and are made explicit in various ways: in the use of colors, in the shapes of the subjects, in the calligraphy of the written works, and in the meaning of the works, sometimes directly expressed and sometimes more conceptual. The theme of memory and identity, linked to Tatjana’s origins and her experience, is therefore a prerogative in the current phase of artist’s research. Her textual works speak of the urban slangs of American ethnic groups. In performative works, Tatjana creates a connection with some aspects related to the daily life and traditions of these communities.

    Filippo Bigagli is, together with Fiammetta Poggi, the director of the Accaventiquattro gallery in Prato. Opened at the end of 2018, the gallery hosts artists in two-person exhibitions and has actively collaborated with SACI, presenting three SACI students in their exhibitions.

  • Iris Richardson

     

     

    My current project, “La Terza Cosa” is a multimedia installation presented through my paintings - photographic works. My artwork takes a critical view of social and cultural behaviors towards objects they see less valuable, therefore dismiss or ignore them. I visually deconstruct the meaning of the objects to the point of unrecognizable representation of its original purpose and assign new value.

    It’s a form of provoking an observer to question the idea of “Value,” by engaging the public in my artist process. I push those boundaries by introducing new media and concepts and allow the work to naturally grow out of this process.

     

     

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  • Lucia Simental

     

    I explore feminine identity by exploring organic and floral motifs with ceramics. Nature, and in particular flowers, represent the fragility of beauty yet the ability to flourish under adversity.

    See below to read comments about Lucia's work by Lucilla Saccà, Professor of History of Contemporary Art at the University of Florence.

     

     

    Artwork

     

    Comments by Lucilla Saccà

    Lucia Simental works on the concept of gender identity, working with elements taken from the naturalistic context. Her ceramics are flowers and bulbs that turn into parts of the female body and underline its shapes; the ceramics are margins that delimit the finely chiseled entrances opening into a mysterious cavity to which the artist gives a sacred aura; many things in the cavity are reminiscent of ancient architectural traditions. The clay is modeled in fantastic racemes, in fragments of architecture, as mentioned above, and the petals of the corolla of flowers come alive and bend lightly. The color spectrum includes shades from yellows, blues, and bright reds to the ten shades of pinks and ivories that allow us to glimpse the original color of the material.

    Professor of History of Contemporary Art at the University of Florence for many years, Lucilla Saccà has been engaged as curator and art historian on contemporary issues, with particular reference to the territory, transmigration, cultural contamination, and the relationships of Italian art with Latin America.

    Among her works: Mimmo Paladino, Gravuras, SãoPaulo 1992; Giovanni Anselmo, Appunti per un’opera, cat. XXII Bienal Internacional di São Paulo, 1994; Fattori e l’Uruguay, Florence 1996; Ketty La Rocca: i suoi scritti, Turin 2005; Neoavanguardia: arte da collezionare, Florence 2013; Abbiamo fatto cose da pazzi. Lamberto Pignotti e la Marucelliana, Florence 2019.

  • Wayne Stoner

     

    Today my work can be described as paintings that present the idea of images sparked by reality in a moment of time that translate pictorially in abstraction, thus finding the abstract in everyday reality.

     

     

     

    Artwork

MFA in Studio Art - 1st-Year

Program Director: Kirsten Stromberg

"In the true spirit of Open Studios, the SACI MFA in Studio Art graduate students addressed the re-visioning of this biannual event, not as a symbol of something lost, but as a unique opportunity to reach out to communities around the world and to share their work in the larger sphere. This event has become not just an onsite Open Studios, but a website Global Studios for them to share their ‘studio spaces’ and work with you across time zones and borders. We welcome you to see what they have been up to."

- Kirsten Stromberg

  • Joe Cimino

     

    My work deals with loss and recovery and its interconnectedness around the greater socio-political discourse regarding migration. Parallel to this, I explore ways of recovering family history by mining through the past and sharing memories with my mother, uncovering a similar thread in stories of immigration throughout Europe in the past.

     

     

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  • Eric J. Frey

     

    As a Veteran and American Artist living abroad, I focus on the concepts of Identity, Time, Space, and Existence, using Object-Oriented Ontology to create metaphors with my experiences and vision to communicate these concepts through my interdisciplinary art practice. Is a hammer still a hammer when it can no longer function as a hammer? Is a body transformed beyond its real parts when observed in condensed time?

     

     

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  • Arais Meteyard

     

    See it to believe it, believe it to see it; the sacred and scientific are equal sides to the same fight.

     

     

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  • Melissa Morris

     

    The potential for the decentering of the self and of the human is central to my work. Through painting, sculpture, and installation, I manipulate the perspectival grid and the grid as a matrix of knowledge to reveal the frame that conditions our seeing and understanding. Re-looking at Renaissance painting and architecture, as well as historical and contemporary images that point to the current and human-created climate crisis, I use strategies of shifting, obscuring, and illuminating to prevent a stable, fixed reading and point to new possibilities.

     

     

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  • David Neal

     

    My current work is about ancient mythology and its function as a moral teaching tool. Individuals may be unfamiliar with these stories and may not be aware of how its history has prompted us to comply with specific morals and rules. I am interested in revealing these connections with my work to bring an awareness to the contemporary situation.

     

     

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  • Xan Peters

     

    My work investigates the boundaries between art and science, representation and reproduction, using traditional observational painting to juxtapose histories. In my practice, I explore the paradoxical gesture of painting, a process concerned with preserving or capturing a moment in time, extinct or lost things that cannot be recreated.

    See below to read comments about Xan's work by Lucilla Saccà, Professor of History of Contemporary Art at the University of Florence.

     

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    Comments by Lucilla Saccà

    Xan Peters makes a bold choice on two fronts: to choose painting as an expressive technique and to investigate with it the potential of the figure – a figure within which the research between art and science takes place and where the anatomical structure, in particular the animal one, undergoes a sort of transformation that can only be achieved in the dimension of art. In a space dominated by a leaden light, imaginary animal figures, and mysterious objects, creations often built with anthropomorphic prostheses are articulated. The immediate reference is Joel Peter Witkin, who the young artist most probably knows, but with substantial differences. The theme of death is completely absent, as is the laborious assembly of the components to be photographed; Peters’s "juxtaposed stories" turn out to be stuck in a time far from existential or provocative anxieties and presents a decidedly conceptual poetic thought.

    Professor of History of Contemporary Art at the University of Florence for many years, Lucilla Saccà has been engaged as curator and art historian on contemporary issues, with particular reference to the territory, transmigration, cultural contamination, and the relationships of Italian art with Latin America.

    Among her works: Mimmo Paladino, Gravuras, SãoPaulo 1992; Giovanni Anselmo, Appunti per un’opera, cat. XXII Bienal Internacional di São Paulo, 1994; Fattori e l’Uruguay, Florence 1996; Ketty La Rocca: i suoi scritti, Turin 2005; Neoavanguardia: arte da collezionare, Florence 2013; Abbiamo fatto cose da pazzi. Lamberto Pignotti e la Marucelliana, Florence 2019.

     

  • Emily Wisniewski

    Disappearing Landscapes and Precarious Livelihoods

    "These paintings explore concepts based on landscapes previously considered sublime, yet imply traumatic connection and disconnection between lifelines in a landscape. In this body of paintings, I seek to reiterate and rewrite the stories told by images I reference with sensitivity to the others associated with these stories. In this body of work, I focus on the precarity of ecosystems and nature-culture convergences and the precarity of intraconnected lifelines within these spaces. I am interested in the current landscape and our embedded interactions therein. The stories of archives decontextualized in today’s neoliberal lens result in a new interpretation and empathy toward the land and intraconnected subjects. These subjects are natural and cultural landscapes that have experienced trauma deeply felt by the livelihoods lost from human-caused destruction. By combining current landscapes with imaginary images, a reference to government research projects on ecosystems, and metaphor within the process of painting, I can create new possible lines of thought in the way we conceptualize the future of our embedded nature."

     

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MFA in Photography - 2nd-Year

Program Directors: Romeo Di Loreto, Jacopo Santini

"Photography, in Kelli's work and particularly in her project focused on Q’eqchi people in Guatemala, is a branch of a comprehensive attitude to social activism from which her photographic approach has inherited its content, direction, and uncompromising ethical code. Her images are a clear expression of her concerns about the relations between the purpose of her project, her profound respect for the right of choice for her subjects, and the role played by aesthetic."

- Romeo Di Loreto, Jacopo Santini

  • Kelli M. Perletti

     

    A processed-based photographer, Kelli works primarily with analogue methods and loves to explore alternative and unconventional processes within photography. Often the work relies on a fusion of analogue and digital methods in order to create the ultimate body of work.

    Sweet River; True Peace is a visual collection of stories highlighting indigenous communities in rural Guatemala that continue to persevere despite facing many obstacles. Following the Maya Q’eqchi’ of Alta Verapaz and Rio Dulce, the body of work brings to the forefront a group of people that, despite facing a history of conquest, religious-based oppression, genocide, and extreme impoverishment, maintain a strong cultural identity. In a rapidly changing world that persuades all people to assimilate, Sweet River; True Peace argues for the importance of maintaining autonomy and cultural identity.

     

     

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MFA in Photography - 1st-year

Program Directors: Romeo Di Loreto, Jacopo Santini

"Situations of global emergency like the one we are facing today sometimes challenge our imagination and ethical code and ask us to react, not by keeping, passively intact, what we were doing before, but by adjusting with flexibility to unprecedented circumstances and creating something new. This is the way Kelli, Marie-France, Lindsey and Rudransh have reacted, and the lesson that all of us have learned."

- Romeo Di Loreto and Jacopo Santini

  • Lindsey Campbell

     

    This semester, I’ve found that I needed to follow my passion above all else. Whether it’s using photography as research or fighting for something I’m passionate about, I’m doing it. I mean, what else can I do?

     

     

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  • Rudransh Nagi

     

    The Bare Minimum series is about our behavior as human beings. While living in Delhi, I heard people complaining about how dirty the city was, even though they were the reason for the degradation, as they were throwing their litter into the streets. This series is not about consumerism or judging what people are using; it is instead about questioning if we are able to recognize and accept our part in ruining our surroundings and environment.

     

     

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  • Marie-France Robichaud

    The main theme of my artistic research is our relationship with time, expressed in a narrative visual form, based on ideas rooted in stories or experiences from the past that can explain the present. This ongoing project at the moment is about my paternal grandmother’s condition. She is affected by a form of dementia, which causes her memory to fade. I am exploring landscape erosion as a metaphor of disintegration of one’s ability to recall the past. I am still in the process of understanding how a link between erosion and memory loss can be made. For now, I am using photographs of eroding landscapes, and photographs and documents that belong to my grandmother.

    Below, read comments about Marie-France Robichaud's work by Bärbel Reinhard, an artist, teacher, and curator living and working in Tuscany.

     

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    Comments by Bärbel Reinhard

    Marie-France Robichaud's work caught my eye right away because it is dealing in a compelling way with the main characteristics - and limits - of photography as a fundamentally spacetime-based medium, but also with its role as a witnessing document between veracity, created memories, and canvas for imagination. By mixing archival material (partly faded like the memories they transport) with landscapes in erosion, she is creating a kind of digital interference and dialogue at the same time, a beautifully composed, vibrant image glitching as a metaphor for changing consciousness through dementia. It could be interesting to see other forms of digital (or, if working with analogue techniques, even chemical) alteration, where the images become partially merged and the landscapes are more prominent as traces of (geological) disintegration. Or to build an evocative recollection of variations with a gradual transformation from the indexical trace, the historical record of different new narratives deriving from the same image (as happens with confusion of memories). Even if their works are very different, perhaps inspiration could come from Daniel Blaufuks and Keisuke Koke? I really would like to see these images physically, which unfortunately isn't possible in these days of quarantine... Thank you very much for showing this interesting work and all my best wishes. I hope to see it soon exhibited!

    Bärbel Reinhard, born in Stuttgart, is an artist, teacher, and curator living and working in Tuscany. After her studies in art history and sociology in Berlin, she graduated with a degree in professional photography from the Fondazione Studio Marangoni in Florence. Her work has been exhibited in various exhibitions in Italy and abroad.

MFA in Communication Design - 2nd-Year

Program Director: Camilla Torna

"In a moment like this, good visual communication is key. It can lift our spirits, inform us and/or make us think. During her time at SACI, Neha Bharadwaj developed a personal style made of friendly visuals in line with a humanistic approach and data visualization, in which Illustration and Information Design combine to literally change people’s perception of the world."

- Camilla Torna

  • Neha Bharadwaj

     

    ‘How are you?
    I’m okay
    No, really?
    Well, it's been hard at work..’

    On May 28th of 2019, WHO officially included burnout as an occupational phenomenon, not just a medical condition. This meant that now, one could be diagnosed with burnout and seek treatment for it. While mental disorders are usually ‘taboo’ and avoided, burnout, on the other hand, is normalized to an extent where the chronic state of exhaustion is celebrated as a sign of success. It is important to understand that while stress is a normal emotional response, burnout is not.

    This project aims to communicate the true meaning and journey of burnout in the human body through the principles of data visualization and infographics, and finally aims to empower users with the right tools to help themselves.

    See below to read comments about Neha's work by designer Michael Reali and Lucilla Saccà, Professor of History of Contemporary Art at the University of Florence.

     

     

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    Comments by Michael Reali

    Neha Bharadwaj's final project raises awareness about burnout. Her research and website give people the opportunity to understand if they suffer from this common ailment and what steps they can take to improve their mental and physical state. In this unprecedented time of self-distancing and working from home, the work-life balance has become even more fragile and the risk of burnout high. I cannot think of a more appropriate theme for Neha's MFA thesis. 

    Neha's approach combines the analytical strength of design thinking with the visual intuition granted by her humanistic illustrative style. She's very good at picking up meaningful details from our daily life and using shapes and colour to create an immediate and strong emotional connection with the viewer/user.

    She has successfully turned complex information into a warm tale that leads the user on an exciting journey of discovery from the unknown to the known, from indifference to awareness and empathy.

    Her work is well-researched, effective, and useful. Just what good design is all about!

    Michael Reali is Head of Design at Lotrek, a digital agency in Pistoia, Italy. After working as a freelancer for a number of years, he decided to join forces with a band of like-minded creatives. He has taught design and programming for the last 10 years.

     

    Comments by Lucilla Saccà

    The artist's graphic design can be defined as the stimulating reduction of a globalized universe. All the work is dominated by a coherent geometrization; the flat and homologated figures have their anatomical interiors traced back to a basic scheme, the same that characterizes objects, from computers to flower pots, to balloons that convey words. We are facing the creation of a universe of signs recognized by a global language, aseptic and devoid of any dramatic emotion. The word burnout, which also appears alongside the schematic reduction of the tree-indicator, is the lowest common denominator of all the work; its disturbing message, which has now become customary, nevertheless seems to diminish in the dimension of the global leveling of the project.

    Professor of History of Contemporary Art at the University of Florence for many years, Lucilla Saccà has been engaged as curator and art historian on contemporary issues, with particular reference to the territory, transmigration, cultural contamination, and the relationships of Italian art with Latin America.

    Among her works: Mimmo Paladino, Gravuras, SãoPaulo 1992; Giovanni Anselmo, Appunti per un’opera, cat. XXII Bienal Internacional di São Paulo, 1994; Fattori e l’Uruguay, Florence 1996; Ketty La Rocca: i suoi scritti, Turin 2005; Neoavanguardia: arte da collezionare, Florence 2013; Abbiamo fatto cose da pazzi. Lamberto Pignotti e la Marucelliana, Florence 2019.

MFA in Communication Design - 1st-Year

Program Director: Camilla Torna

"For a Communication Designer, anything is worth investigating. Bridget Hannah approaches human behaviors, social attitudes, and body postures with a fresh look and bold imagery in every work. Her visual commentary on mass tourism, for instance, unveils a kaleidoscope of collective behaviors (in which each person thinks he/she is unique, by the way) - perfect as editorial content for a city like Florence."

- Camilla Torna

  • Bridget Hannah

     

    I studied psychology and lived at 35,000 feet in the sky as a flight attendant before deciding to study design and make Italy my home. Once I explored the world outside of my cozy, little hometown in Tulsa, Oklahoma, I realized how inspiring it is.

     

     

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