Academics / Faculty Romeo
Di Loreto

"I believe strongly in the mastery of craft, the ability in an image maker to have a great command over the materials with which he/she works." –Romeo Di Loreto

A member of the Royal Photographic Society of England, Romeo Di Loreto has worked for Kodak Canada as the chief division technician of the Kodachrome Processing Laboratories and Research Development Centre for films, papers and chemicals, and Archivi Fratelli Alinari, Florence’s oldest photographic archive.

Romeo Di Loreto is recognized for his knowledge of alternative printing techniques and was the Italian representative for APIS (Alternative Photography International Symposium). He has printed for the Uffizi Museum, Vogue Italy, the Smithsonian Institute, the Francesca Woodman exhibition at Paris Photo, Elle Italy, the Gerhard Richter exhibition at the Pecci Museum, and many other museums, institutions, and publications.

Since 1991, he has taught black & white photography at SACI, and has also taught at New York Universtiy, Fondazione Studio Marangoni in Florence, Syracuse University, California College of Arts and Craft, and Kent State University. He has participated in numerous international exhibitions in Canada, Atlanta, New York, Cologne, England, and Florence. His photographs have been exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and are in the collection of “L'hôtel Les Ateliers de l'Image” in Saint Remy, France.

Romeo Di Loreto has an MFA in Photography, Savannah, Georgia;  BAA in Photography, Sensitometry, and Photographic Chemistry, Ryerson Polytechinical Institute, Toronto, Canada.

Teaching Philosophy
Throughout the history of art, the landscape has been a key theme and subject. This genre has been investigated in all areas of the world and in all periods of art. The landscape was never denied its space, as it has been interpreted by all disciplines. The landscape is such a physical, inescapable place, a subject which we cannot erase. We exist around and within it, we must live with it. Image makers that have used the landscape as a theme are individuals who have understood it; they have not taken it but absorbed it.

Take for example the English painter Constable, an individual who felt and dealt with the landscape around him with great honesty and reverence. More importantly he looked deeply into what the landscape offered and gave to him, and he gave it great respect.

I often describe or use the metaphor that the landscape is my secret mistress. Nature unveils her secrets, slowly allowing me to observe her. Photographing the landscape is a form of ritual for me, an act of intimate giving. I must carefully observe her, sense her and if necessary hold her. Through photography I imprint these magical moments allowing me to hold her forever.

As an instructor I prefer not to use the word teach, but rather live! We must feel, fall, enjoy. As I allow you to live, things will become. I believe strongly in the mastery of craft, the ability in an image maker to have a great command over the materials with which he/she works. This command and craft allows the image maker to interpret the subject in the way he or she envisions it. I feel technique and personal vision support each other; they run parallel, as do the flat and sharp keys on a piano. They are used together or separately creating a harmonized sound.

I believe strongly in the medium of photography, in its strengths and even weaknesses. This medium has great means of communication - it can be as instantaneous as a Polaroid or as complex as a platinum or gelatin silver print. Photography is as precise as the control of the materials; nonetheless leaving mistakes to be beautiful surprises.

Photography and museum quality printing is a very important part of my life. Because of this I feel I transmit a great deal of enthusiasm. I want my students to feel this - I want individuals to live the medium! I want you to make mistakes and to enjoy this beautiful medium.

"I believe strongly in the mastery of craft, the ability in an image maker to have a great command over the materials with which he/she works." –Romeo Di Loreto

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