Academics / Faculty Irene
Biadaioli

"Before restoring a work of art, one must first envision it and, after having "seen" the work in one's mind, actually look at it." - Irene Biadaioli

Author of four publications on restoration, Irene Biadaioli is a restorer of cultural heritage specializing in the conservation of inorganic materials.

Irene Biadaioli teaches Mural Conservation at SACI. Both a restorer and art historian, she has worked as a private restorer since 2010. She completed maintenance and restoration work on the detached paintings of Andrea Orcagna at the Santa Croce Opera Museum and, in 2011, collaborated with the Opificio delle Pietre Dure on the restoration of detached frescoes by Paolo Uccello and his workshop from the Green Cloister of the church of Santa Maria Novella, also consolidating the vaults. She has co-taught in the International Training Project on Mural Paintings at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. In addition, she has restored the Crucifixion by Nicola da Orte (1501) at the former ex-Ospedale dei Raccomandati in Orte (Viterbo), oil paintings by Vincenzo Damini (1744) at Palazzo Ardinghelli in L'Aquila, and the 13th-century frescoes in the Cathedral of San Cerbone in Massa Marittima.

Irene is the author of four publications, two of which focus on OPD restorations, specifically the restoration of the lunette painted in 1843 by Gaspero Martellini under the loggia of the Spedale degli Innocenti representing Jesus Blessing the Children. She also spoke at the conference Forum Kőnstgeschichte Italiens Fünfte Arbeitstagung 2016, organized by the Humboldt University of Berlin, highlighting the problems related to fresco techniques of the 19th century.

Irene graduated in the Conservation and Restoration of Wall Paintings and Stuccos from the Opificio delle Pietre Dure of Florence in 2009. She also obtained a degree in the History of Modern Art from the University of Florence.

Teaching Philosophy
Becoming a restorer does not only mean acquiring knowledge of one’s craft, nor just knowing the chemical components of the materials, but learning to really know the work of art, from its personal history to conceiving its final fruition. The Mural Conservation course leads students towards a greater awareness of the subject through a systematic and never-casual succession of operations that the restorer must always justify with an analytical approach.

"Before restoring a work of art, one must first envision it and, after having "seen" the work in one's mind, actually look at it." - Irene Biadaioli

Share
this page