“Delible Memories,” SACI Digital Multimedia Students Exhibit at OnArt Gallery | SACI College of Art & Design Florence

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“Delible Memories,” SACI Digital Multimedia Students Exhibit at OnArt Gallery

SACI Digital Multimedia students exhibit selected works in “Delible Memories" at OnArt Gallery in Florence.  

Students in SACI’s Digital Multimedia course, led by Dejan Atanackovic, exhibited selected works from the semester in “Delible Memories.” The exhibition was hosted by OnArt Gallery in Florence.

Participating artists included Claire Boston, Lorenzo DeSario, Lindsey Campbell, Joseph Cimino, Claire Griffin, Ashna Hansoti, Hana Hassan, Janet Manina, Rudransh Nagi, Julia Thompson, and the exhibition was curated by instructor Dejan Atanackovic.

Learn more about Digital Multimedia and other courses offered at SACI.

Claire Boston: Flooding Memories
Memory can be a strange thing. It gives us access to who we once were, who we once knew. Memories can quickly be triggered by a song coming on the radio, a scent in the air, a taste on the tongue. Images of the past flood the brain and feelings arise in the heart, displacing reality and the present moment. One memory pools into another. A chain reaction. You are pulled under a spiraling riptide of memories.

Lorenzo DeSario: Still life of decay
Still life of decay is a digital media installation with a projection of a one minute video. The footage explores the unfortunate (and oftentimes jarring) process of aging as a reality in life. When was the last time you called your parents?

Lindsey Campbell: Memory Book
Memory Book is a project about the concept of memory. I happen to have a particular fascination with it, and therefore wanted to work with the idea. Over this past year, I have been sketching memories and adding captions to them in a sketchbook with a tye-dye cover and that’ve covered in stickers that spoke to me. They each recall something special, a moment in time that may have only been one or two seconds long but will stick with me forever now. These adventures have taken me through North and Central America as well as parts of Europe now, and I only hope that it continues to expand. This will become a documentation of growth. Relationships will form, and even more memories will be made.

Joe Cimino: This is Not a Finished Story
This is Not a Finished Story is a work that deals with reconstructing memories and creating a narrative in one's mind. Utilizing home videos and personal footage from multiple locations in time, fragments of digital memories come together to tell the story of a fictitious event. One that focuses on the need to recreate and assemble a scenario that has been so scattered it is barely recognizable. Nevertheless, it is pieced back together to create something entirely new.

Claire Griffin: The Perts and the Griffins
On the left is my Mother’s side of the family. The Perts. She is number 7 of 9 children. Her father, my Grandfather, was in the military, FBI, a salesman, and much more. He provided a life for them that was not lavish but wonderfully fun and filled with so many memories. Her mother stayed home to raise them where her work was never done. They were best friends and watched out for each other, raised each other and made dumb decisions together as all siblings do... this just happened to be x9. On the right side is my Father’s side. The Griffins. He grew up in a completely opposite household. His Mom, my grandmother, from Memphis, Tennessee, ran a very Southern and traditional household in a large 5,000 square foot home. My Grandfather was an eye doctor who also provided a very wonderful life, this one just a bit more lavish. There were only four children and my dad was the youngest. When the Griffins wanted playmates, they walked up one block to the Pert’s house, where they could find endless activity in the craziness of 11 people in a small 3 bedroom house. Both families, no matter the different households, grew up that one block apart. Two of the Griffin boys, Randy, my uncle, and Patrick my father, married Pert girls. Randy marrying Peggy. Patrick marrying Mimi, my mother. Ironic, we know. Needless to say family is clearly a huge part of my life, not just in quantity but in memories which all happen to be in the lovely small beach town of San Clemente California. This collage represents the life of my family before I was born and showcases the people and place that created my current life. If you put the headphones on you will hear a bit of what my current home/family life sounds like. A life that I truly don’t know how I got so blessed to be a part of, filled with music, laughter, and people that give my heart more joy than they will ever know. Please enjoy my tribute to the past, present, and future of my life.

Ashna Hansoti: Breathe – Release - Breathe
Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Breathe. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Breathe. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Breathe. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Breathe. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Breathe. Release. Release. Breathe. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Breathe. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release. Release.

Hana Hassan: Ephemeral
Ephemerality is the concept of things being transitory, existing only briefly. Although our memory retains information over time, most of our access to those memories is fleeting, to the point that each memory becomes an abstract entity where all that is left is a sensation of what the memory holds. My work embodies the abstract characteristic of our memories through ephemeral moments found in nature, specifically with water and light. The space created plays with the level of consciousness and knowledge of what is being seen, much like the that of a memory. When walking through it, one almost recognizes the elements in front of them however all that is being translated is a short-lived abstract sensation of the subject.

Janet Manina: Fade
Fade is a multimedia installation, including a 10 minute video with sound projected on a bed scene made by the artist. The video clips are zoomed in and slowed down, just as memories are fragmented over time. Some sounds are misplaced, overlapping alternate videos where they do not belong, just as our minds play tricks on us and alter our memories without our awareness. The projection represents a dream, and the video is spilling over the bed scene rather than fitting in its constraints, reflecting how memories can provide a sense of overwhelming nostalgia which has the ability to consume a person.

Rudransh Nagi: Five seconds changed my life
As a kid, I have spent hours looking at the stars. Sometimes through the window and sometimes from my home's rooftop. Looking up and searching for different constellations I read about in my science class used to bring me joy. That used to be one of the happiest and beautiful activities of my daily life. My love for stars led me to become a member of the astronomy group in my school. And, in 2007, because of that group, I got to see Saturn and Jupiter through a telescope only for five seconds, and that changed my life forever. That is still the most awe-inspiring, speechless visual satisfaction I had as a human being. That is the reason I became a photographer and got me out of depression. From the past ten years, because of the light and air pollution, the reason that has shaped me and still shaping me had faded away. The alive and twinkling sky is gone. That light is missing due to the haze and smoke. It has shifted into something I don't want to look at. The night sky is dark, dull, and depressed. I don't see any stars now, and I miss looking from my window.

Julia Thompson: 717 Springdale Drive
My grandparents’ home has always been the heart of my family’s traditions, and is the center of my fondest memories. Whenever there was a birthday, holiday, or special occasion, their home was the go-to gathering spot. After the passing of both of my grandparents, saying goodbye to their home meant letting go of a place of gathering and comfort for my entire family. Through this project, I am recreating the essence of their home and reflecting upon the memories that were made at 717 Springdale Drive.


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